UK Voters back the immigration cap

Supporters of all political parties are in favour of significant cuts on immigration. A new poll found 81% of Labour voters, 83% of Liberal Democrats and 89% of Conservatives favoured significant cuts in immigration. The YouGov survey was released at the launch of the Cross-party parliamentary Group calling for a balanced migration policy, under which immigration is capped in line with the number of emigrants to maintain a stable UK population over time.

The group’s co-chairs, former Labour and Conservative ministers Frank Field and Nicholas Soames, said ministers should slash the number of non-EU migrants allowed to settle permanently in the UK after coming here to work for four years. The group hopes this will stabilise the swelling UK population and reduce pressure on public services at a time when immigrants are entering at the highest rate in recorded history.

Government statistics suggest seven million more people will come to live in Britain by 2031, equivalent to adding seven cities the size of Birmingham. Immigration is placing an intolerable burden on schools, transport, the health service and the environment, said the Cross-Party Group. They pointed to results from the poll suggesting that substantial reductions in immigration are backed by voters of all parties as well as Britain’s existing ethnic minorities. Balanced migration was backed by 36% of Labour voters, 43% of Liberal Democrats and 23% of Tories. Among ethnic minority voters, 75% thought immigration should be cut, with 36% backing balanced migration.

The survey, commissioned on the group’s behalf by think tank Migrationwatch UK, showed that a programme of “Balanced Migration” could have a major effect on voting intentions in a future election. Migrationwatch chairman Sir Andrew Green said: "Concern about the present massive uncontrolled level of immigration is not a partisan issue. I hope that all the political parties will now get the message and engage in a constructive debate about balanced migration in the months ahead."