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Bright foreign students with brighter ideas to find UK doors open


Government pledges a new route for bright, innovative students with business idea

23rd March 2011: Innovative students with business ideas will soon find the doors to the UK wide open.
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For the `government has also pledged to develop a new entrepreneur route for bright and innovative students, who have a business idea and want to make it work in the UK’.

The Home Secretary, Theresa May, said: ‘I am delighted to announce that, alongside our stricter rules, we will ensure that innovative student entrepreneurs who are creating wealth are able to stay in the UK to pursue their ideas.’

The announcement comes soon after the government made clear its plans to dole out 1,000 visas per annum for exceptionally talented migrants in the fields of science, arts and humanities.

The permission to stay in the UK will initially be granted to them for three years and four months. But, they will be able to extend their stay for a further two years, and to settle here after five years’ residence in the UK.

This innovative new route for exceptionally talented migrants will be limited to 1,000 visas per year. It is for talented migrants already recognised or have the potential to be recognised as leaders in the fields of science, arts and humanities.

The UK Border Agency has elaborated: Migrants seeking entry under Tier 1 (Exceptional talent) will not need to be sponsored by an employer, but will need to be endorsed by an accredited competent body. These competent bodies will be announced in the near future. It will be for each competent body to select those who will qualify for endorsement.
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`Under Tier 1 (Exceptional talent), migrants will initially be granted permission to stay in the UK for three years and four months. They will then be able to extend their stay for a further two years, and to settle here after five years’ residence in the UK’.

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