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Census: Britain more ethnically diverse and less religious

Latest census figures show that Britain is more ethnically diverse and less religious than it was a decade ago.

The census reveals that resident population of England and Wales on 27th March 2011 was 56.1 million, a seven per cent (3.7 million) increase since 2001. Fifty five per cent (2.1 million) of this increase is due to migration.

Twelve per cent (2.0 million) of households with at least two people had partners or household members of different ethnic groups in 2011, a three percentage point increase on 2001 (nine per cent, 1.4 million).

Of the 13 per cent (7.5 million) of residents of England and Wales on 27th March 2011 who were born outside of the UK, just over half (3.8 million) arrived in the last 10 years.

Nearly 4.8 million residents held a non-UK passport that was either an EU passport (2.3 million) or a foreign passport (2.4 million).

Most residents of England and Wales belonged to the White ethnic group (86 per cent, 48.2 million) in 2011, and the majority of these belonged to the White British group (80 per cent of the total population, 45.1 million). In London in 2011, 45 per cent (3.7 million) out of 8.2 million usual residents were White British.

The number of residents who stated that their religion was Christian in 2011 was fewer than in 2001. The size of this group decreased 13 percentage points to 59 per cent (33.2 million) in 2011 from 72 per cent (37.3 million) in 2001.

The size of the group who stated that they had no religious affiliation increased by 10 percentage points from 15 per cent (7.7 million) in 2001 to 25 per cent (14.1 million) in 2011.
 

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