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Multi-cultural Britain continues to attract migrants


They are coming at a rate of one a minute


6th April 2010:
Multi-cultural Britain continues to attract migrants. They are, in fact, finding their way to Britain at a rate of one a minute.

Official figures suggest more than 518,000 people moved to the UK last year. On an average, it comes out to be more than 1,400 a day.

The figures also suggest the annual number of people granted British citizenship has also registered an increase by almost 60 per cent between 2008 and 2009.

The figures, quoted by former UKIP leader Nigel Farage, come at a time when the benefits of migration to the UK’s economy are an open secret.

Only recently an official document had suggested migration has not only enhanced economic growth, but has general benefits as well; and a new policy framework is needed to maximize the contribution of migration to the Government’s wider social aims.
(See: https://www.foreignersinuk.co.uk/news-social_engineering_played_a_part_in_the_uk_s_migration_policy_1533.html).

The paper suggested migration would enhance economic growth. Any attempts to halt or reverse it could be economically damaging. The paper, written in 2000 when immigration began to increase dramatically, said controls were contrary to policy objectives and could lead to social exclusion

Otherwise also, the opinion on Britain benefiting from multiculturalism is gaining credence. Only recently, former Downing Street adviser Andrew Neather had claimed mass migration was encouraged by Labour ministers over the past decade to make the UK truly multicultural, and plug in the gaps in the labour market. He had asserted the policy has made London a more attractive and diverse place.

Neather, who worked as a speechwriter for Tony Blair and in the Home Office for Jack Straw and David Blunkett, had asserted the mass influx of migrant workers was neither a mistake, nor a miscalculation. It was rather a policy the party preferred not to reveal to its core voters.

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