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Save the date: national rally for earned amnesty on May 4th

Strangers into Citizens calls for justice for migrants at National Rally in Trafalgar Square in Central on May bank holiday Concerned by the emergence of a new underclass of people in Britain who are denied basic rights, the country’s largest alliance of civic institutions is campaigning for immigration reform.

Strangers into Citizens is calling for a pathway to legal rights for undocumented migrants who have made new lives in the UK.

Strangers into Citizens proposes that migrants who have been in the UK for four years or more be granted a two-year work permit. At the end of that period, subject to employer and character references, they should be granted leave to remain.
strangers_citizens.pngThe case for a one-off regularisation as part of the Government’s overhaul of immigration policy is compelling – on humanitarian, economic, fiscal and administrative grounds, state the organizers.

“We want to show the UK government that there is a broad coalition that supports an earned amnesty for irregular migrants,” Strangers into Citizens says. Such “earned amnesties” have been successfully carried out in other European countries and the US.

The first National Rally calling for support for Strangers into Citizens was organised in May 2007. More than 15,000 people came from London, Birmingham and other cities to Trafalgar Square to show their support.

“This year we are bigger than ever, so save the date, spread the word and join us when we demand for the UK government to recognise the contribution of migrants to UK society,” Strangers into Citizens says.

“Join us on 4th May to send a clear message that migrants give more than they take. Be part of the largest ever rally in support of migrants in British history.”

For more information please contact 020 7043 9881 or check out the website at www.strangersintocitizens.org.uk

STRANGERS INTO CITIZENS IS CALLING FOR:

• A pathway to citizenship for migrants who have put down roots in the UK
• A recognition that migrants remain vital to the UK economy and society, even in the downturn
• An end to limbo for people fleeing persecution who have waited on a decision for many years

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