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Scotland set to break its population record

Baby boom, boost up from immigration makes the difference


22nd October 2009:
A baby boom and a colossal boost up from immigration are all set to see Scotland break its population record in the next three years.

According to a new report, the apprehension that the trend of declining number of residents is irreversible is apparently ill founded; and there has been a spectacular turnaround since the beginning of the millennium.

The findings are significant as until recently it was apprehended that the population was likely to fall in long run due to factors like an ageing population.

But now, the figures released by the General-Register of Scotland foresee a rise in population to its highest ever level by 2012. It is expected to exceed the earlier record of 5.25 million set in 1974.

It is predicted that by 2033, Scottish inhabitants would reach 5.54 million mark. The number will include elderly population. It is believed the number of over-75s will almost double over that period.

Elaborating, Register-General Duncan Macniven says the prognosis suggest a greater rise in Scotland’s population than was expected, due to continuing rise in the birth rate, and also because migration has stayed at a relatively high level.

The report goes on to predict the numbers of immigrants are likely to fall over the next six years from a peak of 20,000 in 2007-08 to around 12,000 per year. The report suggests the number of younger people will decrease over the next 25 years, while increase of a third is predicted in pensioner numbers.

A spokesman for Age Concern and Help the Aged Scotland blamed the Scottish Government of failing to include older people in its planning. But, Public Health Minister Shona Robison said they recognised the fact that ageing population meant the way care for older people was provided required change.

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