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Woolas defends intra-company transfers

Says they make Britain an attractive place to do business


6th January 2010
: Even though the Home Office has all along been asserting intra-company transfers are important for making the UK an attractive place for business, apprehensions have again surfaced among a section of British workers.

The fears follow reports that an estimated 30,000 non-EU migrant workers entered the UK through the route in the technology sector last year. A majority of them are from India.

The reports come soon after the Home Office made it clear only the ones beneficial for the UK were being allowed to enter. It had, in fact, asserted the number of workers coming in via this route was strictly controlled by the points-based system – meaning only those the UK needs can come here.

It had added a worker seeking intra-company transfer would be required to display appropriate level of earnings and qualifications.

Immigration Minister Phil Woolas too has now defended the transfers, saying they made Britain an attractive place to do business. Workers that come in via this route most display the appropriate level of earnings and qualifications and the numbers are strictly controlled by the points-based system, meaning only those the UK needs can come here.

The report, meanwhile, said a total of 45,000 non-EU foreign workers came to Britain under the scheme last year. It was up from 15,400 when Labour came to power in 1997.

The figures released by the Home Office indicated almost 70 per cent of them were Indians. Rather, seven of the top 10 companies in UK bringing in IT workers were Indian.

The top on the list was Tata Consultancy Services. The company sponsored 4,465 intra-company transfers last year, followed by Infosys Technology with 3,030.

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