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Iraq expresses concern over `manhandling’ of deported refugees

VP’s office calls for practicing international laws, norms

 

23rd June 2010: Less than a week after the UK Border Agency personnel were accused of roughing up Iraqi asylum seekers deported from the UK, the Iraqi Vice-President Adel Abdul Abdul Mehdi has expressed concern.

The asylum seekers had accused the UKBA personnel to beating them up while get them on and off the plane.

One of the deportees, Sherwan Abdullah, a Kurd, had alleged they were beaten up by UKBA personnel in an attempt to force them off the plane in Baghdad.

In a statement, the Vice-President’s office has called for practicing international laws and norms in dealing with asylum seekers.

It statement said coinciding with the International Refugees’ Day, “we assert the necessity for observing international laws and measures stipulated in international agreements on dealing with refugees and not taking harsh measure in dealing with them.”

The statement added in an attempt to guarantee that justice and the principles of human rights are being implemented in dealing with Iraqis requesting asylum, Iraqi specialized authorities will follow up the issue with international agencies, including UN High Commissioner for Refugees UNHCR, because of the importance of the issue

The deported asylum seeker, Abdullah, had earlier the UKBA personnel grabbed them and threatened them with beating if they did not come down.

He had further alleged the necks of those unwilling to come out were grabbed so hard the people could not breathe.

As many as 42 Iraqis were `forced returned’ to Baghdad. The entire process was carried out in a hush-hush manner and no information of any sort was handed out.

Declining to comment on specific allegations, the UKBA had added minimum force would only be used as a last resort when an individual became disruptive or refused to comply.

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