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Asians more likely to be anti-immigration, than white Britons

Asians in UK training guns against brethrens wanting to immigrate


28th February 2011: Asians settled in the UK are apparently training guns against their brethrens wanting to immigrate.
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A research commissioned by the Searchlight Educational Trust has come out with the conclusion that Asians are more likely to be anti-immigration, than white Britons.

The study has, in fact, found opposition to new immigration now gone beyond race, with more Asians opposed to immigration than white Britons.

Statistically speaking, the research shows as many as 39 per cent of Asians are in favour of applying brakes to immigration, compared to 34 per cent of whites. About 21 per cent of blacks are also of the stop-immigration view. They are of the opinion that immigration should be stopped either on a permanent basis, or till the time the UK’s economy is back on solid grounds.

The report, `Fear and Hope: The New Politics of Identity’, comes at a time when Labour is under criticism for its open door policy of letting in the immigrants.

The poll, considered one of the largest studies on the subject, was conducted by Populus. The findings are based on 91 questions to more than 5,000 individuals.

The report goes on to express the view that the inability of mainstream parties to address the issue of immigration is paving way for possible surfacing of a far right party.

As many as 48 per cent of those talked to were not closed to the idea of lending a supporting hand to a new far-right party as long as it has nothing to do with ‘fascist imagery’ and did not close eyes to violence.

The report indicates that peoples’ approach to immigration was by and largely wrought by their level of economic optimism. Those fearing for their jobs and long term economic wellbeing were more likely to be opposed to further immigration.

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